What You Need to Know About Texas’s Cell Phone Ordinance and Distracted Driving

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Abogado Aly Cell Phone Ordinance

While it may not come as a surprise, a large percentage of all car wrecks involve “driver distraction.” This has lead to the Texas State legislature moving to enact sweeping restrictions in this past year in 2017 that affects anyone using a cell phone while operating a car, truck, or other motor-vehicle.

Necessary Changes

The National Safety Council, in conjunction with researchers from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, estimates that over 50% of all fatal car accidents involved at least one driver who was distracted by their cell phone moments before the crash. These statistics are even higher among teenage drivers, prompting some in government to seek the designation of so-called “distracted driving” as a public health crisis.

What Is Different?

At what began in early 2018, Texas drivers (statewide) can expect to be pulled over and ticketed for sending or receiving text messages while driving. Furthermore, all drivers under the age of 18 are entirely prohibited from using any kind of wireless communication device while driving. Adult drivers, however, may still use cellphones through the use of a hands-free device.

School bus drivers, and certain operators of other heavy machinery, are also entirely prohibited from cell phone use regardless of age—particularly when they are engaged in the transportation of children. Further, all adults are restricted from any sort of wireless communication while driving through school zones.

And while the Texas State legislature has enacted these new restrictions, Texas municipalities have been free since 2009 to institute their own local regulations concerning phone use while driving—and in those jurisdictions in which the local rules either match the new legislation or exceed it in terms of punishment, those local laws will continue to control.

The New Consequences Of Texting and Driving

Fines for cell phone use while driving, exclusive of court costs and other fees, may be between $25 and $99 depending on what part of Texas a defendant is pulled over in. All tickets issued for distracted driving are misdemeanors, unless they involve serious injury or loss of life. Fines for repeat offenders could reach as high as $200 per ticketed instance of distracted driving, and distracted driving that results in injury or death could result in a criminal conviction resulting in up to 1 year in prison and a fine of $4,000.

In the end, Texans should take this Cell Phone Ordinance very seriously. It’s better to be safe than sorry. Not only are you putting yourself at risk when driving distracted by a cell phone, but you’re putting other drives and other passengers at risk as well.

from Abogado Aly Law http://ift.tt/2GTkB3L

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What You Need to Know About Texas’s Cell Phone Ordinance and Distracted Driving

Abogado Aly Recent Blog Post

Abogado Aly Cell Phone Ordinance

While it may not come as a surprise, a large percentage of all car wrecks involve “driver distraction.” This has lead to the Texas State legislature moving to enact sweeping restrictions in this past year in 2017 that affects anyone using a cell phone while operating a car, truck, or other motor-vehicle.

Necessary Changes

The National Safety Council, in conjunction with researchers from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, estimates that over 50% of all fatal car accidents involved at least one driver who was distracted by their cell phone moments before the crash. These statistics are even higher among teenage drivers, prompting some in government to seek the designation of so-called “distracted driving” as a public health crisis.

What Is Different?

At what began in early 2018, Texas drivers (statewide) can expect to be pulled over and ticketed for sending or receiving text messages while driving. Furthermore, all drivers under the age of 18 are entirely prohibited from using any kind of wireless communication device while driving. Adult drivers, however, may still use cellphones through the use of a hands-free device.

School bus drivers, and certain operators of other heavy machinery, are also entirely prohibited from cell phone use regardless of age—particularly when they are engaged in the transportation of children. Further, all adults are restricted from any sort of wireless communication while driving through school zones.

And while the Texas State legislature has enacted these new restrictions, Texas municipalities have been free since 2009 to institute their own local regulations concerning phone use while driving—and in those jurisdictions in which the local rules either match the new legislation or exceed it in terms of punishment, those local laws will continue to control.

The New Consequences Of Texting and Driving

Fines for cell phone use while driving, exclusive of court costs and other fees, may be between $25 and $99 depending on what part of Texas a defendant is pulled over in. All tickets issued for distracted driving are misdemeanors, unless they involve serious injury or loss of life. Fines for repeat offenders could reach as high as $200 per ticketed instance of distracted driving, and distracted driving that results in injury or death could result in a criminal conviction resulting in up to 1 year in prison and a fine of $4,000.

In the end, Texans should take this Cell Phone Ordinance very seriously. It’s better to be safe than sorry. Not only are you putting yourself at risk when driving distracted by a cell phone, but you’re putting other drives and other passengers at risk as well.

from Abogado Aly Law http://ift.tt/2GTkB3L

What You Need to Know About Texas’s Cell Phone Ordinance and Distracted Driving

Abogado Aly Recent Blog Post

Abogado Aly Cell Phone Ordinance

While it may not come as a surprise, a large percentage of all car wrecks involve “driver distraction.” This has lead to the Texas State legislature moving to enact sweeping restrictions in this past year in 2017 that affects anyone using a cell phone while operating a car, truck, or other motor-vehicle.

Necessary Changes

The National Safety Council, in conjunction with researchers from the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, estimates that over 50% of all fatal car accidents involved at least one driver who was distracted by their cell phone moments before the crash. These statistics are even higher among teenage drivers, prompting some in government to seek the designation of so-called “distracted driving” as a public health crisis.

What Is Different?

At what began in early 2018, Texas drivers (statewide) can expect to be pulled over and ticketed for sending or receiving text messages while driving. Furthermore, all drivers under the age of 18 are entirely prohibited from using any kind of wireless communication device while driving. Adult drivers, however, may still use cellphones through the use of a hands-free device.

School bus drivers, and certain operators of other heavy machinery, are also entirely prohibited from cell phone use regardless of age—particularly when they are engaged in the transportation of children. Further, all adults are restricted from any sort of wireless communication while driving through school zones.

And while the Texas State legislature has enacted these new restrictions, Texas municipalities have been free since 2009 to institute their own local regulations concerning phone use while driving—and in those jurisdictions in which the local rules either match the new legislation or exceed it in terms of punishment, those local laws will continue to control.

The New Consequences Of Texting and Driving

Fines for cell phone use while driving, exclusive of court costs and other fees, may be between $25 and $99 depending on what part of Texas a defendant is pulled over in. All tickets issued for distracted driving are misdemeanors, unless they involve serious injury or loss of life. Fines for repeat offenders could reach as high as $200 per ticketed instance of distracted driving, and distracted driving that results in injury or death could result in a criminal conviction resulting in up to 1 year in prison and a fine of $4,000.

In the end, Texans should take this Cell Phone Ordinance very seriously. It’s better to be safe than sorry. Not only are you putting yourself at risk when driving distracted by a cell phone, but you’re putting other drives and other passengers at risk as well.

from Abogado Aly Law http://ift.tt/2GTkB3L

Protesters and Civil Liberties

Abogado Aly Most Recent Blog PostAbogado Aly Civil

The year of 2017 saw a huge swell in public protests stemming from racial unrest and displeasure with systemic injustices targeted at certain groups of people. Since the death of Trayvon Martin in 2012, the grassroots activist group Black Lives Matter has staged public protests, marches, and social media campaigns designed to bring awareness to the plight of people of color against law enforcement and the criminal justice system. On the other end of the spectrum, though, white nationalists and white supremacists have also taken to the streets with torches to protest the immigration policies they view as lax and the perceived vilification of white and caucasian Americans. Each group independently caught pushback from both the media and their communities, who bemoaned the damage to public property and the need for increased crowd control and first responders.

These two forces came to a head in Charlottesville, when a clash between a white nationalist group and a combination of Antifa (anti-facist) and Black Lives Matter protesters ended in fist-fights, property damage and destruction, arson, and the death of a young white woman.

Sympathizers of both Black Lives Matter and White Nationalism have accused the other side of hurling “hate speech” and inciting race-based violence against the other. Both claim the other uses inflammatory verbiage, divisive rhetoric, and skewed-if-not-wholly false information to debase the other and forward their own agenda. To that end, speakers or activists considered too political on one side or another have been barred from speaking on various college campuses. While the administrators of these institutions of higher learning tend to call on “security concerns” when prohibiting “extremists” from either side from speaking on campuses, many believe that these higher ed institutions are sheltering their students and suppressing certain viewpoints in violation of the first amendment.

Calls to “stop hate speech” on both sides have reinvigorated first amendment fanatics who are nervous about how far we’ll be able to limit free speech in the name of reducing violence. The first amendment as it’s written prohibits the US government from passing laws that infringe on the people’s right to free speech. We have made some important caveats, though, the classic example being that a person can’t yell “fire” in a crowded theater to purposefully incite panic. We also prohibit organizing terrorist threats against the US.

While we can’t legally stop people from saying what they want, the administrators of some of the biggest social media websites can claim that it’s against their terms of service to post racially insensitive or discriminatory information or to actively champion such causes as ethnic cleansing or white supremacy. Unlike the government, social media platforms are private businesses who can set terms and conditions under which they will permit users to utilize their services. Twitter and various white nationalist groups have been caught up in a cat-and-mouse game over how to ensure that twitter’s crawlers catch white nationalists and only white nationalists, but their algorithm isn’t great, and their terms aren’t clear.

The future of free speech as it pertains to potentially offensive and inflammatory information is yet to be determined, but as our society proves more and more divided, we’ll have to come to a new truce sooner rather than later to avoid more deadly clashes.

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Texas K-9 Units in Police Force

Abogado Aly Recent Blog Post

When you think of dogs, you think of them as the friendly, family pets that live in your home, run around the backyard, and enjoy a nice bone every now and then. What we often overlook as pet owners is that dogs are extremely intelligent creatures with incredible abilities.

 

K-9 units are critical factors of modern law, and enhancing overall police work. The intelligence and abilities dogs have been providing aid to police forces for many decades, so just how exactly are K-9 units used in Texas? Here are a select few units from various areas of Texas.

 

The University of Texas at Austin’s K-9 Unit

 

While most K-9 units are geared towards protecting the general public, the University of Texas at Austin has their very own K-9 unit, established to protect students, faculty, and more. College campuses are a major target for crimes, so a security measure was taken to create the campus’s canines.

 

These police service dogs are on duty when their handlers are, going off duty and joining their handler’s as part of their families. The three main goals of this K-9 unit on campus is to enhance police searches for evidence and explosive devices, and apprehending violent criminals.

 

The K-9 Unit of Arlington, Texas

 

Established with one canine and one handler, Arlington’s K-9 unit began in 1979. Today, the unit operates between 3 teams that each take a city-wide operation basis. The main use for this K-9 unit in Arlington is high-risk cases and building searches. All 3 of the handlers at Arlington are 15+ year veterans of the police force with over 10 years of experience with K-9 units. This highly trained and skilled K-9 unit is one to look up to in Texas.

 

The K-9 Unit of Fort Worth, Texas

 

Dating back to 1962 the Texas K-9 unit of Forth Worth has come a long way. Not only is this a K-9 unit, but also a Training Academy for handlers and canines to come and train. The grounds even hold a dedicated tombstone for all of the dogs that have served in this police force. Although it was founded on burglary prevention, this K-9 unit is part of a Special Operations Division. The dogs are hand selected based on their abilities to hunt, desire to play, courage and socialization. This K-9 unit shows just how important these canines are to their task force.

The K-9 Unit of Houston, Texas

 

Last but not least, we bring attention to the K-9 unit of Houston, the main town for Abogado Aly’s law offices. An older K-9 unit in Texas, this team was founded in 1959. It’s K-9 unit is one of Houston Police Department’s oldest Patrol Divisions. A much larger department, there are 39 team members that are assigned to various departments of police force. These canines were even featured in a month’s segment on Houston PetTalk.

from Abogado Aly Law http://ift.tt/2ggxR6s

Texas K-9 Units in Police Force

Abogado Aly Recent Blog Post

When you think of dogs, you think of them as the friendly, family pets that live in your home, run around the backyard, and enjoy a nice bone every now and then. What we often overlook as pet owners is that dogs are extremely intelligent creatures with incredible abilities.

 

K-9 units are critical factors of modern law, and enhancing overall police work. The intelligence and abilities dogs have been providing aid to police forces for many decades, so just how exactly are K-9 units used in Texas? Here are a select few units from various areas of Texas.

 

The University of Texas at Austin’s K-9 Unit

 

While most K-9 units are geared towards protecting the general public, the University of Texas at Austin has their very own K-9 unit, established to protect students, faculty, and more. College campuses are a major target for crimes, so a security measure was taken to create the campus’s canines.

 

These police service dogs are on duty when their handlers are, going off duty and joining their handler’s as part of their families. The three main goals of this K-9 unit on campus is to enhance police searches for evidence and explosive devices, and apprehending violent criminals.

 

The K-9 Unit of Arlington, Texas

 

Established with one canine and one handler, Arlington’s K-9 unit began in 1979. Today, the unit operates between 3 teams that each take a city-wide operation basis. The main use for this K-9 unit in Arlington is high-risk cases and building searches. All 3 of the handlers at Arlington are 15+ year veterans of the police force with over 10 years of experience with K-9 units. This highly trained and skilled K-9 unit is one to look up to in Texas.

 

The K-9 Unit of Fort Worth, Texas

 

Dating back to 1962 the Texas K-9 unit of Forth Worth has come a long way. Not only is this a K-9 unit, but also a Training Academy for handlers and canines to come and train. The grounds even hold a dedicated tombstone for all of the dogs that have served in this police force. Although it was founded on burglary prevention, this K-9 unit is part of a Special Operations Division. The dogs are hand selected based on their abilities to hunt, desire to play, courage and socialization. This K-9 unit shows just how important these canines are to their task force.

The K-9 Unit of Houston, Texas

 

Last but not least, we bring attention to the K-9 unit of Houston, the main town for Abogado Aly’s law offices. An older K-9 unit in Texas, this team was founded in 1959. It’s K-9 unit is one of Houston Police Department’s oldest Patrol Divisions. A much larger department, there are 39 team members that are assigned to various departments of police force. These canines were even featured in a month’s segment on Houston PetTalk.

from Abogado Aly Law http://ift.tt/2ggxR6s

Texas K-9 Units in Police Force

Abogado Aly Recent Blog Post

When you think of dogs, you think of them as the friendly, family pets that live in your home, run around the backyard, and enjoy a nice bone every now and then. What we often overlook as pet owners is that dogs are extremely intelligent creatures with incredible abilities.

 

K-9 units are critical factors of modern law, and enhancing overall police work. The intelligence and abilities dogs have been providing aid to police forces for many decades, so just how exactly are K-9 units used in Texas? Here are a select few units from various areas of Texas.

 

The University of Texas at Austin’s K-9 Unit

 

While most K-9 units are geared towards protecting the general public, the University of Texas at Austin has their very own K-9 unit, established to protect students, faculty, and more. College campuses are a major target for crimes, so a security measure was taken to create the campus’s canines.

 

These police service dogs are on duty when their handlers are, going off duty and joining their handler’s as part of their families. The three main goals of this K-9 unit on campus is to enhance police searches for evidence and explosive devices, and apprehending violent criminals.

 

The K-9 Unit of Arlington, Texas

 

Established with one canine and one handler, Arlington’s K-9 unit began in 1979. Today, the unit operates between 3 teams that each take a city-wide operation basis. The main use for this K-9 unit in Arlington is high-risk cases and building searches. All 3 of the handlers at Arlington are 15+ year veterans of the police force with over 10 years of experience with K-9 units. This highly trained and skilled K-9 unit is one to look up to in Texas.

 

The K-9 Unit of Fort Worth, Texas

 

Dating back to 1962 the Texas K-9 unit of Forth Worth has come a long way. Not only is this a K-9 unit, but also a Training Academy for handlers and canines to come and train. The grounds even hold a dedicated tombstone for all of the dogs that have served in this police force. Although it was founded on burglary prevention, this K-9 unit is part of a Special Operations Division. The dogs are hand selected based on their abilities to hunt, desire to play, courage and socialization. This K-9 unit shows just how important these canines are to their task force.

The K-9 Unit of Houston, Texas

 

Last but not least, we bring attention to the K-9 unit of Houston, the main town for Abogado Aly’s law offices. An older K-9 unit in Texas, this team was founded in 1959. It’s K-9 unit is one of Houston Police Department’s oldest Patrol Divisions. A much larger department, there are 39 team members that are assigned to various departments of police force. These canines were even featured in a month’s segment on Houston PetTalk.

from Abogado Aly Law http://ift.tt/2ggxR6s

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